ACW (VII) Afterthought

Some Rebs.

Read that as a complement of ACW (VI), here is the rest of the order and a comment by dourpouritan that I sent to the painters considering it quite to the point. Hope dourpuritan does not mind. A great thing the Baccus Forum!

B.- Confederate Infantry stands:

B1.-     Number one on the diagrams, 20 minis glued as shown, meaning as together (centred) as on a typical stand of 28 minis such POLEMOS. But right flank refused as in A5. Mixed lot. Use different colours for hats.

B2.-     Same as above but left flank refused.

B3.-     12 minis + Mounted officer.. All “straw coloured” hats. Centred in stand. Flanks unprotected.

B4.-     Stand with two small Brigades. 24 minis + Mounted Officer. First rank of the rear Bgde.  and Second rank of forward Bgde.  can be aligned. Quite as A6.

B5.-     Same as B4 minus mounted officer. When aligned like this they have to match B4 and B6 position glued as to look a “LINE”. In fact it would look as an standard POLEMOS stand with two sets of colours, no skirmishers and pushed forward.

B6.-     Same as B4 but symmetrical, see diagram. 

TOTAL of 124 infantry minis and 3 mounted officers. (Include 9 command strips).

For the Infantry stands you will need 14 units of 60x30mm bases NOT INCLUDED.

ACW Cavalry Stands:

Colour of horses predominantly Dark and Red Bays, some Black. All buglers on white horses. Mix a bit.

C1.-     60x30mm stand with 9 minis (UNION) wading a river as mentioned in previous emails:

The idea is to have in a 60×30 Baccus standard base of 9 figures unit in column wading a river… IN LONGITUDINAL WAY DIRECTION FRONT OF 30mm … that means: To cut the bases of the first three (command) and the last two troopers, and the whole legs of the horses (4) in the middle of the base, glue them like that in a more or less “disordered way” but still in column… and paint the base sky blue… as WATER.

C2.-     Same as above but Confederate. (No butternut)

C3.-     A typical Cavalry Brigade of 9 minis (UNION) as per POLEMOS… but in arrow formation as seen in the Forum in Baccus webpage. Officer forward and troopers on each side a bit behind each time, so that the extremes are the more back figures. Quite straightforward.

C4.-     Same as above. Confederate. (No butternut)

Now, what to do with the remaining mounted minis?. NO officer’s left but still guidons (standard-bearers) and buglers.

Please use 30×30 stands on the rest, groups of 4 minis, 2 in front 2 behind as you have done for me repeatedly.

C5.-     4 Union stands, guidon on front rank (right side), bugler front rank (left side). Two troopers behind. Please mix hats and kepis.

C6.-     2 Confederate Stands same as above. (No butternut)

C7.-     4 Union stands with 4 troopers mixed headgear.

C8.-     2 Confederate Stands with 4 troopers as C7. (No Butternut).

i subsequently attached the following to my order because I am a bit tired of Confederates looking like Boers.

As many modern US articles now make apparent, many existing grey uniforms have been affected by light over the years and have faded to a pale brownish colour. This gave the impression that the majority of ordinary soldiers wore butternut coloured uniforms, which is not the case. Secondly, butternut uniforms were produced but mostly in the early part of the war. This was because the Confederate commissary had not got up to full steam and requested that soldiers’ families provide them with uniforms  where the state did not have enough to go round. The rural population used readily available cheap butternut dye to colour these uniforms. By 1863 the state and Confederate suppliers were much better organised with several main supply depots across the Confederacy plus more imported uniforms getting through the blockade. Nevetheless, there was no standard grey colour – the tone varying from almost white to dark bluish grey depending on which depot had produced the uniform. Many of the imported uniform items were of the bluish grey variety (which led to friendly fire incidents). Similarly the regulation light blue trousers were rather uncommon. Many were infact captured Union trousers, and these were eventually ordered to be redyed or bleached before wearing, again owing to friendly fire incidents. This is not to say that home made uniforms and butternut disappeared entirely. Rather they became less common as the war progressed (contrary to the oft pedalled myth that the Confederate army of 1864/5 was just a bunch of ragamuffins). dourpuritan comment posted in Baccus Forum.

Guess that makes ACW (VI) and (VII) more comprehensive.

Author: Alejo Dorca

Born in 1952. Married in 1976. Two sons and a daughter. 4 grandsons to date, 3 boys and a girl. Arquitect in 1978. Retired in 2016 aprox. Lifelong Toy Soldiers aficionado.